NC Dance Festival

posted on July 31, 2019 by Paislee

The NC Dance Festival brings professional modern dance choreographers from across the state together to share innovative and moving dance works. NCDF is celebrating its 29th season with shows in traditional and non-traditional venues across NC. Energetic, unexpected, powerful, and joyous, the concert presents a wide variety of NC dance.

Friday, November 8: NC Dance Festival

GreenHill Gallery, 8pm

Greensboro Cultural Center

200 N. Davie St, Greensboro

$10 suggested donation

 

In this show, three choreographers will inhabit the gallery space in this intimate performance. In Studio C Project’s (Durham) atmospheric “Two,” three dancers follow two sets of movement instructions, discovering connections and testing the accuracy of memory. Vania Claiborne (Burlington) presents “(Bro)tha/Brother”, a duet for two men that celebrates and explores black male joy, friendship, and humanity. Janice Lancaster (Winston-Salem) explores interior and exterior landscapes of memory and identity in the solo “graze,” conjuring the sense of vast grasslands through the symbolism of a pair of elk antlers. Greensboro Dance Film Festival will also screen a short dance film as part of their 6th annual season. A conversation with the artists follows the performance.

 

Saturday, November 9: NC Dance Festival

Van Dyke Performance Space, 8pm

Greensboro Cultural Center

200 N. Davie St, Greensboro

Tickets starting at $15

In this performance, Kira Blazek-Ziaii’s (Winston-Salem) quartet for women, “Keep It Together,” uses humor, sweeping legwork, and effortful partnering to showcase independence balanced by interdependence. In “To Meep Like a Peep” by Durham’s Megan Ross, dancers communicate through a language of wiggles and bounces set to the engaging music of DJ Plie. Megan Yankee (Durham), presents a section of an autobiographical, evening-length solo titled “Qué gringa, que gringa” (loosely translated as “What white girl, that white girl”), that explores identity and mixed heritage within the current political climate in the US. The Clarice Young Project (Greensboro) presents “re(belle),” a powerful and energetic group piece about daring to be different. MARO Movement (Southern Pines) explores the sometimes taboo topic of mortality and vulnerability with “Impact,” inspired by choreographer Matthew Rock’s late grandmother. “2078”, by Christine Bowen Stevens (Greensboro) explores group dynamics through form and function, abstraction and realism.

 

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